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Has Anyone Experiences With Narcisstic Personality Disorder And Alzheimer's?

Has Anyone Experiences With Narcisstic Personality Disorder And Alzheimer's?

My husband has always had a Narsisstic personality now dementia with narcissism much worse. Has anyone heard the expression "Gaslighting" it, was a movie in the 40's or earlier. Now he's much more violent.

A myALZteam Member said:

A family member is NPD. Please get as much help as you can and NEVER feel guilty if you can't manage him any more. Your health safety and happiness is also so very important! God bless you both! đź’—

edited, originally posted over 4 years ago
A myALZteam Member said:

My sister had early onset AD (<50 yrs old). She was a special ed teacher for nearly 30 years, very active in her church and community. Her fear was that she would be nasty or mean as her disease progressed. She never was, not one minute. Sometimes, I wonder if the dominant personality persists through the Disease. My dad had a mean temper that would rear it’s ugly head with me at times. Every one else praised him for his sense of humor. As his AD progressed, he would get angry (lack of control) when he knew that he forgot something. He didn’t know what he forgot. The last week of his life (he died January 2nd) he was so sweet, smiled a lot and giggled when tried to say something and it didn’t come out right!
One thing that I learned in the last 18 months with him was..... every moment was different, as soon as you think you have him or her figured out, they change! Change is inevitable. Patience and prayers!

posted over 4 years ago
A myALZteam Member said:

My father was an angry man (usually under the surface). He was very distant for 40 years until he and my stepmother realized that they needed help and that the few relatives living close by had died or were too old to help.They lived 8 hours away from dads kids and 16 hours away from her son.
Often with AD or dementia there is some paranoia, hallucinations and inability to process conversations or the written word. My dad would totally twist something that had been said and before you knew it, he was so angry, saying horrible things to me - fortunately I was able to realize that he might be facing me as he is yelling but it was his lack of control that frustrated him, not me. One day, early on, I asked him if he knew who I was....He waved me off and said "One of the kids" - Thank you dad! From then on, if he yelled about something, I assumed that he was yelling at the "Black sheep of the family" LOL
My dad was started on low dose Prozac and it CHANGED his life (and everyone else). After a year, the dose was increased to twice a day and it was wonderful. Since I lived with them for a little over a year, I was able to REALLY see what was going on with them. I kept a very brief journal so that I could report significant changes to the doctor.
Sometimes medication is necessary, the damage going on in their brain may respond to chemistry just as a diabetic with a poorly function pancreas needs insulin.

My 2 cents.

posted over 4 years ago
A myALZteam Member said:

@A myALZteam Member , are there any family members that can help you? I've learned that the caretakers need to take care of themselves in order to take care of others. Take some time for yourself every now and then it works wonders.

posted over 4 years ago
A myALZteam Member said:

Gaslighting is horrible, so damaging. I wonder how much it’s rekated to the mental changes and fear in the person? Aside from any personality issues? Don’t know. Just know the verbal/emotional abuse can cut so deeply.

posted over 4 years ago
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