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Non Stop Walking And Talking In Alzheimers Patient?

Non Stop Walking And Talking In Alzheimers Patient?

Hi.
My mom has alzheimers. And is going through a phase where she can't sit down for more than a few minutes at a time . She just walks up and down all day. She also doesn't stop talking. Sadly she doesn't make sense when she talks and mixes everything up. But she talks non stop.
We were just wondering if this is a normal phase that alzheimers patients go through?
And if there are any tips to help her relax?
Thank you in advance

A myALZteam Member said:

My mother will do this on occasion, where she will talk to herself or one of her stuffed animals or her doll for hours and isn’t looking for a response from my father or I so we are able to come and go from the room. But when she does it while we are trying to watch TV together or when she will constantly get up and walk around the room, moving stuff around on the tables or shelves (she will often push things around until they fall off) or stand in front of the TV or us and talk or continue to hand us things, it can be a bit disruptive. I will at that point try to get her focused on something. Usually I will sit right next to her and read to her. She likes that and doesn’t really care what I read. I usually go for a children’s book so she can look at the pictures while I read or another favorite is the Chicken Soup for the Soul books. Other times I will engage her with a craft (foam art, painting a birdhouse, etc) or helping me bake cookies or brownies or something. She also likes to watch me work on my laptop, doesn’t matter what I am doing. I can be checking a monthly data report, with just a bunch of numbers scrolling by and she will just watch it. Other times I will show her YouTube videos of cute animals. The thing is, the only thing that I have found that worked is to engage her in some one on one activity. Sorry this was so long, but I hope something I shared will help.

posted over 2 years ago
A myALZteam Member said:

OMG, this is my husband to a T. Pace, pace, move things, pace and moves the same things again. It’s only the two of us. Wants to go home but doesn’t know where that is. Tells me I have taken everything from him. I can’t put him in a home because I need his SS to help pay the mortgage. I am so afraid of the future

posted 10 months ago
A myALZteam Member said:

Woke up at 4am to pop fully clothed with his jacket and all I asked him where he was going at such an hour and he answered with them. Them who pop? Them damnit. Ok where is them going? Home were going home. I asked where they were. He said downstairs so we went to look. When he realized THEY were not there he went back to bed......

posted over 2 years ago
A myALZteam Member said:

My mother does this. I liken it to being a caged animal. She just paces back and forth in the house and repeats things all day or restates what she thinks happened over and over again. It’s almost as though she’s trying to force things to “stick”. It is my understanding that part of it is from the fear of what is happening. She is at a point in the disease that she recognizes something is wrong but her brain can’t process it. Being still allows the thoughts of fear to be more active. We have started having a health care assistant come into the house a few days a week for social and mental stimulation and that seems to help.

posted over 2 years ago
A myALZteam Member said:

Hi Trixie, your description of your Dad is a mirror image of Alistair's, even the bit about going into other resident's rooms. He is a lot more settled now after 3 weeks, so hopefully your Dad will do so too. It's just heartbreaking to have to leave them there, bur it is the only way to go.

posted over 2 years ago
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