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How Do You Address The Future.

How Do You Address The Future.

We are pretty early in my husband’s diagnosis. We both have career backgrounds in medicine. He will talk about there being no cure for Alzheimer’s, but still talks about the doctor fixing it. I have tried to discuss a little of what might be coming, I know that somewhere he knows. He doesn’t retain that so I have been saying it progresses differently for everyone. When he focuses on his deficits to much he becomes scared and tearful. I understand! The other side of the coin is that I would like… read more

A myALZteam Member said:

Regarding the future....there are many helpful ideas here among the group. I agree with talking with children, setting up wills and powers of atty and advanced directive, and then enjoying the days as much as possible. Read "The 36 Hour Day". It will help. And see a counselor if it will help you. Blessings to all. One day at a time.

posted over 1 year ago
A myALZteam Member said:

My husband‘s diagnosis is vascular dementia, given almost 2 years ago. We knew for several years before that that he was having a really hard time with his memory but attributed it to advancing age. He is now 75.

We started with a free test given at our behavioral health research center, the series of 30 questions where they see what you can remember. The woman who gave it said he passed, but barely. She said he really struggled to get the answers.

I asked our primary care doctor what to do and he suggested taking him to a neurologist. I asked around, picked one, and we see the PA at the neurologist’s office. He did several tests, including a brain scan and said there’s definitely a problem. He also sent us to a neuropsychologist for further testing. He has been taking Namzaric for nearly 2 years. I’m not sure if it helps, but was afraid not to try.

When my husband has trouble doing something, I’ll remind him that he has something wrong with his brain, it is not his fault, it’s OK. So far so good. He has always been extremely laid-back, and that helps. I am a retired teacher, so I’m used to being in charge and that helps too.

As for the future, there is really no way of knowing how things will play out. We all know what we want, but no guarantees of that happening. I have made sure we have wills, living wills, and I also have durable power of attorney for him as well as health care power of attorney. We all have to prepare of the best we can, depending on our circumstances. And then we go on living, loving, and hoping for the best.😋

edited, originally posted over 1 year ago
A myALZteam Member said:

Hi, and welcome. We dealt with this stuff as a family. I involved our girls in confirming my concerns about Jackie’s behaviours. After her diagnosis we took 6 months to make a considered decision about our future, again involving the kids. Then, perhaps the bit most relevant to your question, we updated our wills together and made Powers of Attorney together, again involving the girls. The conversations you have to have to deal with these important issues cover most of the big issues coming down the track. By doing both of ours together we made it about us, not about Jackie. Good luck. S.

posted over 1 year ago
A myALZteam Member said:

I have similar issue.. hubby acknowledges he knows he has it but won’t go to specialist.. has gone to primary and is on Aricept. Sometimes when he gets frustrated at himself, I empathize and reinforce that it’s part of the dementia. Not sure if that’s the best way to handle it. Others on here might have ideas. Hugs.

posted over 1 year ago
A myALZteam Member said:

Please, please visit an elder care lawyer and get everything in order. You need to have your financial and medical POA in place in case something happens. You never realize how many times this is necessary until you are actually in need of it. I realize it is hard, but it is something that needs to be done.

posted over 1 year ago
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