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I Want To Go Home

I Want To Go Home

My client has been repeating , she wants to go home I'm not sure she's thinking about her past where she came from as a little girl what does that mean, and how to deal with it?

A myALZteam Member said:

From my personal experience with my mom, yes they are thinking about the past. When my mom asks to go home, I redirect her into something else. Such as, look out at the sunshine, mom...it’s a gorgeous day today, isn’t it.

posted over 1 year ago
A myALZteam Member said:

You might try to distract her by telling her that 'we will go as soon as I finish the breakfast dishes/ this TV show/ etc.' Then try to get her interested in something. It won't always work but worth a try.

posted over 1 year ago
A myALZteam Member said:

My father-in-law went through this but his ALZ has progressed & he has stopped. He had already become convinced that he was living in his son's house in another city & began wanting to go home even though he was in his own home. We couldn't figure out what home he was longing for until he visited with a man that came to do yardwork. He confided in him that he wanted to go home to a small farmhouse which he lived in as a child. It was on a farm he lived & worked at with his parents as migrant farm workers when he was about 6 years old.

There were nights when he wouldn't settle down so my mother-in-law would take him for a drive. Upon returning home he would be ok. She would also do as KareP said. Tell him they couldn't go to his old home because there was repair work going on or that the road was flooded, things to distract him in the moment until he forgot or was pacified. It took my M-I-L time to learn this technique because she felt quilty lieing to him. She has learned that, in her present situation, lieing is acceptable because it becomes essential to helping ALZ sufferers.

posted over 1 year ago
A myALZteam Member said:

My mom says that too. We tend to let it pass or tell her gently this is home now.

posted over 1 year ago
A myALZteam Member said:

My wife says this as well. I can’t see it being her childhood home because of how horrible her childhood was. She is always talking about our daughters and I’m thinking she is referring to her time raising them and that home. I’ve asked who is there and she has said “my family.” It’s so hard! 😢

posted 4 months ago
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